Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Scenic trip around the Cacapon River, West Virginia

Yum
 On my last travel post, Historic Romney, West Virginia, I left off turning in for the night at our Motel. The next morning we were bright eyed and bushy tailed, as they say, for a little hiking adventure. First on the agenda was the Ice Mountain Preserve located off country roads about 30 minutes east of Romney, WV. While they are open to the public you do need to reserve a tour/guide because the trails are only accessed through private properties. There are two different trails you can enjoy here: lower trail that leads to Ice “vents” or the top of the peak trail, called Raven’s Rocks.
I would say the trails are moderate hiking level. They have a mountain incline to go down and climb back up. Once you walk down the trail, you enter back in time. The ice "vents" in the ground provide cool temperatures that encourage rare arctic plants to glow along side the tropical plants. These stay cold throughout winter and are the last place to thaw late into the Summer. The plants grown here are not found in this area on normal conditions. They are a complete natural wonder preserved in this mountain side.

Our guides were both excited to share the different specimens that grow in this area verses what naturally grows in the reign. Be sure to curve time out for this tour because it can get lengthy depending on the guide you choose. Although at the time of our hiking I opted out of the hike to the top and looking back on wish I hadn't. The views I saw on other writers pages were spectacular!
 After our hike we ventured across the Cacapon River using this magnificent Capon Bridge (pictured above). I have a serious thing for capturing architecture and bridges! 
Once across the bridge we stopped at the River House. At first glance it looks to be a restaurant but once inside you find it is so much more! It is a nonprofit ideal to house local artisans while providing food and entertainment.
 Arts, music mono-culture is bringing youth to the Potomac mountain region. They are looking for a sustainable life and to put down roots for generations to come. More so than the coal mining, the arts create more reasons to gather to express yourself through multi-generations! You could easily walk into the this establishment and meet all walks of life conversing and enjoying one's company without skipping a beat.
Is it the food? It very well could be! Locally grown, sourced and prepared. Everything from the art on the walls, music in the background to the food you consume resonates the passion for this area. You feel like you are welcomed and apart of something when you sit down to a meal. It just feels like "home".
 After another full day in West Virginia exploring, eating and taking in it's rich history we headed to a place found deep in the woods, Capon Springs.
I thought long and hard about whether I would just give Capon Springs and Farms a quick mention at the end of this post. I felt it deserves a whole post all to itself! So while I did mention it here I will be writing another post reviewing it in it's entirety!
 Think of a place that is one step up from a campground sitting on 4,700-acre. It houses a 9-hole golf course, Fling gulf and a par-3 course. World known "healing waters" filter throughout the entire property off the Capon Spring. These are just a few of the many treasures you will find here. I hope you tune back in to read my next post featuring the Capon Springs and Farms.
Have you traveled around the Cacapon River in West Virginia??
Have you hear about the "healing waters" at Capon Spring??

2 comments:

  1. Love your review of our area. We are all proud of the places you've mentioned and the people who guide and maintain them. Please come back, there's even more to see.
    A Capon Bridge resident.

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  2. That was a fun trip. Nice hanging with you on it.

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